Sydney Lupkin

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Two highly anticipated COVID-19 pills have been authorized for emergency use and allocated for shipment to states, but the supply is tight, and the rollout varies from state to state.

Moncef Slaoui, the former head of the Trump administration's Operation Warp Speed, says he's "cautiously optimistic" about how well existing vaccines will hold up against omicron, the latest coronavirus variant of concern.

Omicron has more mutations than previous variants, with around 30 mutations on just its spike protein.

That's worrying for virologists, who note that the spike protein is what vaccines use to "teach" our bodies to recognize the coronavirus.

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Sudeep Taksali thought his battle to avoid a medication's steep price tag was over. He was wrong.

Some Americans are already lining up for COVID-19 booster shots, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning that administering doses of the vaccine in ways that aren't OK'd by the federal government could put health care providers at risk of lawsuits and leave patients with unexpected bills.

These so-called "off-label" uses include giving the vaccine out as a booster shot to people who are not immunocompromised, or using it to vaccinate children under the age of 12 for whom the shot is not yet authorized.

It was 17 days before Pfizer's first delivery deadline under its federal COVID-19 vaccine contract, and the company wasn't going to meet it, according to federal records and several people familiar with the matter.

Officials with Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration's multibillion-dollar push to make a COVID-19 vaccine available in record time, didn't know there was a problem.

Health officials are preparing to roll out COVID-19 booster shots in the United States this September. According to a plan announced Wednesday, all U.S. adults who received a two-dose vaccine would be eligible for an additional jab of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine eight months from when they got their second one.

As Emergent BioSolution's Baltimore factory was throwing away unfinished COVID-19 vaccine doses and struggling to pass muster with the Food and Drug Administration, the company awarded at least $3 million in bonuses to a handful of executives, according to documents released by a congressional subcommittee Wednesday.

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