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  The Alabama Department of Public Health is reporting 10,978 deaths related to COVID-19 in Alabama. The state says 8,648 of those deaths are confirmed to be from coronavirus, while 2,330 are probable.

The ADPH reports there have been 531,094 total cases of coronavirus in Alabama - 410,483 being confirmed and 120,611 being probable. There have been 2,531,623 diagnostic tests conducted and 135,849 antibody tests. These numbers are as of May 11.

In the last 14 days, 111,198 people have been tested and 3,327 positive cases have been reported.

  The Alabama Department of Public Health is reporting 10,913 deaths related to COVID-19 in Alabama. The state says 8,602 of those deaths are confirmed to be from coronavirus, while 2,311 are probable.

The ADPH reports there have been 528,784 total cases of coronavirus in Alabama - 409,028 being confirmed and 119,756 being probable. There have been 2,510,134 diagnostic tests conducted and 134,324 antibody tests. These numbers are as of May 3.

In the last 14 days, 118,822 people have been tested and 3,771 positive cases have been reported.

WVAS Jazz Appreciation Month

Apr 29, 2021

WVAS Jazz Appreciation Month

Apr 22, 2021

 Restaurant owners are seeing customers return in waves now that more people are vaccinated and feel more comfortable about going out, but many are having trouble meeting the demands of crowds.

The owner of Tostadas in Homewood says staff have a lot more mouths to feed these days

“In the last 6 weeks, our business has picked up and we’re seeing volume we haven’t seen in a long time,” said Hal Craig, Owner.

But, even after a busy weekend rush – the restaurant was forced to close Monday.

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In the middle of the Little Tokyo neighborhood of Los Angeles, there's a monument dedicated to the 442nd Infantry Regiment of the U.S. Army, which was composed of Nisei, second-generation Japanese American soldiers in World War II.

Named after the regiment's motto — "Go For Broke" — the inscription on the monument reads in part, "Looked upon with suspicion, set apart and deprived of their constitutional rights, they nevertheless remained steadfast and served with indomitable spirit and uncommon valor, for theirs was a fight to prove loyalty."

Copyright 2021 Wyoming Public Radio. To see more, visit Wyoming Public Radio.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Why do people hoard things and what do the things they hoard say about them?

Artist and poet Kate Durbin explores this relationship between people and their stuff in her third book of poems Hoarders, out now.

Inspired by the A&E television series of the same name, the book is a collection of poem-portraits that focus on individuals and the objects they hold on to.

Copyright 2021 Michigan Radio. To see more, visit Michigan Radio.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

President Biden continues conversations with congressional Republicans on Thursday in the hopes of landing a bipartisan deal on an infrastructure package, but major hurdles persist over what items would be in the measure, and how it might be paid for.

There exists, in some alternate universe, a version of the new HBO Max series Hacks that is spikier, faster, meaner — and as a result, considerably thinner, less generous and less rewarding — than the one that premieres today.

Happily, this one's pretty great, because it achieves and maintains a delicate balance born out of: 1. Knowing its subject and 2. A determination to treat its two lead characters fairly.

After more than two years living in churches to avoid deportation to Jamaica, Clive and Oneita Thompson noticed some basic life skills had deteriorated.

The first time Oneita went to take out money from an ATM, she said, "'Wait a minute, what do you do again?' ... I truly did not remember how to use my card."

Sometimes, when Oneita wakes up in the morning, she needs to remind herself the family is free.

Amid dropping vaccine demand in Ohio, Governor Mike DeWine announced five, weekly drawings of $1 million open to residents who've received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. A similar lottery for teenagers will provide the lucky names with a full, four-year scholarship to a public university in Ohio - room and board included.

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