Mary Louise Kelly

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If you've ever waited for a late subway train, you most certainly have stared into dark railways, maybe wondering what on earth might live in there.

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The U.S. will donate 500 million doses of COVID vaccine to the rest of the world. President Biden made that announcement today in Cornwall, England.

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Let's examine the case for Simon Biles as greatest of all time. She won her seventh U.S. gymnastics title over the weekend. That is a record. Joining me now is sports writer Liz Clarke from The Washington Post.

Hey there.

LIZ CLARKE: Hi there.

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Updated June 10, 2021 at 10:15 AM ET

From the pandemic and protests for racial justice to a pivotal presidential election and Senate runoff, the last year and a half has been a news cycle like no other.

And yes, professional journalists across the country have been all over it. But so have student journalists at college newspapers around the country.

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If you haven't already heard...

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SHAPIRO: ...Brood X cicadas are still singing across parts of the U.S. including here in Washington, D.C.

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Updated June 9, 2021 at 11:31 AM ET

From the pandemic to racial justice protests, a contested election and a second presidential impeachment: The events of the past year divided the nation, but they also challenged conventional notions held in newsrooms about objectivity and fairly representing diverse points of view.

Updated June 3, 2021 at 11:30 AM ET

The Declaration of Independence says, "We hold these truths to be self-evident." Those truths the founders were talking about are at the core of American democracy — that all people are created equal, that they have certain inherent rights, that governments get their power from the people they serve.

But what happens when the people aren't united in a shared set of facts — when "truth" isn't evident or agreed upon?

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