Becky Sullivan

Updated November 19, 2021 at 9:42 PM ET

After 27 hours of deliberation over the course of four days, a jury declared Kyle Rittenhouse not guilty on the five charges he faced after fatally shooting two people and wounding a third during a night of unrest in Kenosha, Wis., last year.

Rittenhouse trembled as the verdict was read, count by count, then collapsed in sobs.

Updated November 19, 2021 at 5:53 PM ET

Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18-year-old who fatally shot two people during the unrest last year in Kenosha, Wis., has been acquitted of all charges in a criminal trial that divided the nation over questions about gun rights, violence at racial justice protests and vigilantism.

The verdict, delivered Friday, follows a highly watched trial in which prosecutors struggled to overcome Rittenhouse's claim that he acted in self-defense on the night of the shootings.

As the jury deliberated for a second day in the criminal trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18-year-old who fatally shot two people during unrest last year in Kenosha, Wis., defense attorneys petitioned for a mistrial over a key piece of video evidence that could be crucial to the prosecution's case.

The mistrial request — which is the defense's second of the trial — came Wednesday afternoon after jurors asked to review a handful of videos from the case.

Even to those who had never stepped foot in a Wisconsin courtroom, it was clear from the moment jury selection began that Judge Bruce Schroeder — the judge presiding over the state's highest-profile criminal trial in years — would prove memorable.

As the cameras switched on and livestreams began for the first moments of the highly watched criminal trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18-year-old accused of homicide after fatally shooting two people during unrest last year in Kenosha, Wis. — the judge was playing Jeopardy! with the potential jurors.

Updated November 16, 2021 at 6:59 PM ET

Twelve jurors have begun deliberations in the criminal trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, who fatally shot two protesters and wounded a third during the unrest last year in Kenosha, Wis.

Jurors deliberated for roughly eight hours on Tuesday without reaching a verdict. They will resume deliberations Wednesday at 9 a.m. CT.

Updated November 15, 2021 at 6:59 PM ET

In closing arguments in the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, jurors heard two versions of the deadly night of Aug. 25, 2020: Was Rittenhouse a well-intentioned, responsible young man trying to keep his community safe when he was attacked by violent people trying to harm him? Or was he a reckless teenager who went looking for trouble in Kenosha, Wis., where he killed two people who intended him no harm?

Prosecutors and defense lawyers have rested their cases in the closely watched homicide trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18-year-old who shot and killed two protesters one night last year in Wisconsin.

Over eight days of testimony — including a dramatic turn by Rittenhouse himself, where he sobbed on the stand — witnesses and visual evidence described a tense and chaotic night filled with fires, verbal threats and physical intimidation and where guns abounded, in the hands of protesters and self-styled militiamen alike.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Prosecutors indicated in court Thursday that they plan to submit additional charges in the homicide trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18-year-old who shot and killed two protesters last year at a chaotic demonstration in Wisconsin.

Rittenhouse currently faces six charges for his actions in Kenosha on the night of Aug. 25, 2020, when he was armed with an AR-15 rifle. He killed Joseph Rosenbaum, 36, and Anthony Huber, 26, and injured Gaige Grosskreutz.

Updated November 10, 2021 at 5:58 PM ET

Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18-year-old who shot and killed two demonstrators at a racial justice protest last year in Kenosha, Wis., took the stand in his highly-watched homicide trial to say he feared for his life when he fired his rifle.

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