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Supreme Court to hear Trump ballot case; U.S. strike kills Iran-backed militia leader

MoveOn members hold signs that read "Disqualify Trump" during a rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court of the United States earlier this month. On Thursday, the Court hears arguments in an appeal of a Colorado court ruling that could keep Trump off that state's primary primary ballot.
Paul Morigi
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Getty Images for MoveOn
MoveOn members hold signs that read "Disqualify Trump" during a rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court of the United States earlier this month. On Thursday, the Court hears arguments in an appeal of a Colorado court ruling that could keep Trump off that state's primary primary ballot.

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Today's top stories

The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments today over whether former President Donald Trump should be disqualified from Colorado's ballot. Colorado's Supreme Court, citing the 14th Amendment to the Constitution, ruled in December that Trump should be barred from appearing on the ballot because of his role on Jan. 6.

  • Trump has argued that barring him from the ballot would open the floodgates, NPR's Carrie Johnson tells Up First. She speaks to one of Trump's lawyers, who warns that today's hearing could lead to a constant stream of litigation as people attempt to prevent everyone from President Biden and Vice President Harris to senators and representatives from appearing on ballots.
  • While the Justices hear arguments in Washington, Trump is expected to return to Nevada as the state holds its Republican caucuses. As the frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination, he's virtually guaranteed to win all of the state's delegates.


A U.S. drone strike in Iraq's capital has killed at least one leader of the Iran-backed group Kataib Hezbollah, according to the Pentagon. The U.S. military said yesterday that the commander is responsible for "directly planning and participating in attacks" on American troops in the region. Last month, an attack on an American base in Jordan killed three service members.

  • NPR's Jane Arraf reports from Baghdad, where she says the mood in the capital is one of "apprehension and fear." Some members of the anti-U.S. resistance that Kataib Hezbollah belonged to have called for new attacks against the United States. Arraf adds that the strike will "almost certainly" affect talks between the U.S. and Iraq on the future of American forces in the country. 


Pakistanis head to the polls today for an election that has been marred by violence. Yesterday, two bombs in Pakistan's Balochistan province killed at least 28 people and injured dozens more, according to officials. Pakistani authorities suspended mobile phone services across the country, citing the recent attacks.

  • Much of the election is focused on a man whose name isn't even on the ballot: former Prime Minister Imran Khan. He was ousted after he defied Pakistan's military and is arguably the country's most popular leader, NPR's Diaa Hadid says. Khan is in prison, and his party isn't allowed to participate in the election. Hadid reports Khan's allies have circumvented restrictions by running as independents, using chatbots to tell voters who to vote for, holding TikTok campaign rallies and using AI-generated "Khan-like" personas" to rally supporters. 


Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu yesterday rejected a cease-fire plan from Hamas, calling it "delusional." U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who was in the region, told reporters there was still room for negotiations to continue, and "we will work at that relentlessly until we get there."

  • Several protests have taken place in recent weeks in Gaza to demand a cease-fire as residents express frustration with Hamas leaders and Israel's bombings. Even some of those who support Hamas say the group misjudged the consequences and criticize Hamas for preparing its fighters, but not its civilians, for the war.

Deep dive

When it comes to curbing auto thefts, the St. Paul, Minn., police department has focused on education and prevention. Sgt. Mike Ernster, the department's public information officer, says enforcement is important, but "we won't be able to arrest our way out of this."
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Getty Images
When it comes to curbing auto thefts, the St. Paul, Minn., police department has focused on education and prevention. Sgt. Mike Ernster, the department's public information officer, says enforcement is important, but "we won't be able to arrest our way out of this."

Car thefts have surged in the U.S., but one city has been able to reduce them. The Council on Criminal Justice (CCJ) found that from 2022 to 2023, car thefts in St. Paul, Minn., fell nearly 40% — the largest decline of any city surveyed. Officials say prevention and youth intervention contributed to their success.

  • A TikTok exposing a security vulnerability in some Kia and Hyundai models drove the carjacking surge. The video became a challenge, especially among teens who posted their own videos showing how fast they could steal a car.
  • St. Paul's police department has done targeted ad campaigns in places where data showed high rates of vehicle theft. They also educated residents about what can make their cars vulnerable to theft and provided people with accessories that deter theft.
  • Free youth sports and after-school programs in the city encourage kids to stay away from carjacking and more dangerous activities. 

Life advice

In her new book <em>Get the Picture, </em>journalist Bianca Bosker explores why connecting with art sometimes feels harder than it has to be. Above, a visitor takes in paintings at The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in London in 2010.
Peter Macdiarmid / Getty Images
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In her new book Get the Picture, journalist Bianca Bosker explores why connecting with art sometimes feels harder than it has to be. Above, a visitor takes in paintings at The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in London in 2010.

Ever looked at art and thought, "I don't get it?" Bianca Bosker has written a book for you. Get the Picture explores the difficult-to-understand aspects of the art and the art world. She spent five years working as a gallery assistant and helping artists in their studios. She even got a job as a security guard in the Guggenheim to learn everything she could about the exclusive world of art. While the industry can be snobby, here's her advice for a meaningful art experience:

  • Slow down. Take your time looking at a piece rather than trying to see everything in the gallery.
  • Challenge yourself to notice five specific things about the artwork.
  • Get to the source. Break away from museums and fine art at schools, galleries and garages. 


Want to make your own art? Check out Life Kit's guide about adding creativity to your life and creating an art habit.

3 things to know before you go

A Spanish seafood company says its octopus farm would benefit animals in the wild, citing growing demand for octopus meat. Here, an octopus is seen at the Get Fish market in Sydney, Australia, last December.
Jenny Evans / Getty Images
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Getty Images
A Spanish seafood company says its octopus farm would benefit animals in the wild, citing growing demand for octopus meat. Here, an octopus is seen at the Get Fish market in Sydney, Australia, last December.

  1. A company in Spain is facing backlash against plans to commercially farm octopuses for food. Activists say the animals are too intelligent. 
  2. Move over, Amazon Prime. Six months after TikTok unveiled its e-commerce feature, TikTok Shop has taken over the app. But some users feel the ads worsen user experience.
  3. A wardrobe malfunction during the Super Bowl 20 years ago caused a global meltdown. In Toxic: Women, Fame, and the Tabloid 2000s, author Sarah Ditum explores how society has since reckoned with Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson's "Nipplegate" moment.

This newsletter was edited by Majd Al-Waheidi. Mansee Khurana contributed.

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