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Hyles Files - Scraps

May 7, 2019

Alabama confirms case of measles

May 3, 2019

   Alabama health officials say there is a confirmed case of measles in the state. State Health Officer Scott Harris says a case of measles was confirmed Thursday in an infant under 1-year-old. The infant was not old enough to have been immunized. The Alabama case is in St. Clair County. It is the first confirmed case in Alabama after concerns about a resurgence of measles in several parts of the country. Harris says most of those outbreaks involved people who traveled internationally and brought the illness into areas with large numbers of unvaccinated people.

     The Alabama House of Representatives has approved a pay raise for correctional officers as Alabama faces a federal court order to increase prison staff. Representatives voted 92-0 Tuesday night to give officers a 5% pay increase, expand bonuses and create a payout program for unused annual leave.

Lottery legislation to come up this week

Apr 22, 2019
lottery.ok.gov

   Lawmakers are headed to a vote on lottery legislation this week, as supporters aim to change Alabama's status as one of the few states without the games. The Senate Tourism and Marketing Committee is scheduled to vote Tuesday on one of two rival lottery proposals introduced this session. Senate President Pro Tempore Del Marsh said his hope is to get a bill before the full Senate on Thursday. If a bill is approved by both chambers, the proposal would go before Alabama voters.

     The Alabama Supreme Court has appointed a new judge to oversee the trial of a Montgomery police officer accused of murder in the shooting of an unarmed black man. The court last week named retired Court of Criminal Appeals Judge Samuel Henry Welch to preside in the case. Aaron Cody Smith is awaiting trial in the fatal shooting of 58-year-old Greg Gunn nearly three years ago. Smith contends he fired in self-defense after Gunn fought with him.

   French street artist JR’s mural of Montgomery residents has begun installation at One Court Square downtown. The Inside Out project had photographed more than 16-hundred people in Montgomery as of Sunday afternoon. Sarah Beatty Buller with local revitalizer Montgomery Builds says 2-thousand pictures are supposed to be taken, but the turnout has been greater than anticipated. The project has continued all week and in fact, an Inside Out pop-up photo booth will be on the campus of Alabama State University Thursday from 10am until 2pm for students, faculty, staff and alumni.

Southern Poverty Law Center names new leader

Apr 3, 2019

   The Southern Poverty Law Center has new leadership. Former juvenile court judge Karen Baynes-Dunning has been named as the group’s interim president and chief executive officer. She has served on the SPLC board of directors since 2017. Baynes-Dunning now becomes the organization’s first African-American woman president. The SPLC statement says there will now be a nationwide search for a permanent leader.

This announcement follows the firing of SPLC founder Morris Dees and t

amazon.com

   The Alabama State University Distinguished Lecture Series is bringing a special guest to its campus Friday. Former Alabama Death Row inmate Anthony Ray Hinton will share his story at the event. He was wrongly convicted of murder and spent 28 years in prison. His best-selling book “The Sun Does Shine : How I found Life and Freedom on Death Row” was a selection for the Summer 2018 Oprah Book Club.

The lecture begins at 10am at ASU’s Abernathy College of Education auditorium, to be followed by a VIP 

     A prosecutor says he'll seek the death penalty against a man charged in the slayings of two Alabama teenagers nearly 20 years ago. District Attorney Kirke Adams says 45-year-old Coley McCraney can be prosecuted for capital murder in the killings of 17-year-olds Tracie Hawlett and J.B.

   

Alabama drivers will see a 10-cent per gallon increase in the state gas tax to fund road and bridge construction, under legislation signed into law Tuesday by Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey. Ivey signed the bill, and related measures into law, shortly after they won final approval in the Alabama Legislature. The swift legislative approval was a political victory for Ivey, who called lawmakers into special session to consider the tax increase, and for Republican legislative leaders who also threw their support behind the bill.

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